A Case Study of CDIO Implementation in the Course of Hacking Exposed at Duy Tan Universty

A Case Study of CDIO Implementation in the Course of Hacking Exposed at Duy Tan Universty

[Anonymous] A Case Study of CDIO Implementation in the Course of Hacking Exposed at Duy Tan Universty.

Integration of theoretical knowledge and practical skills in teaching and learning is usually one of the focuses in CDIO implementation. However, it is not always as smooth as it should be for some study subjects. Hacking exposed in Information Technology (IT) is one of such subjects: without the theoretical knowledge about computer networks, it is almost impossible to develop computer hacking skills while learning computer network theories or practices by-the-book only will not yield much benefit when the technology changes. This paper presents a real-world case study for successful learning of the course of Hacking Exposed at Duy Tan University by combining the teaching of an in-school project with the trying-out of at-work practices in attacking and defending computer networks. Specifically, the in-school project is closely structured around related network theories while the at-work practices to be learned at each stage of the project are openly discussed and tried out on various computer platforms and/or with any newly-introduced trick and tip. At-work practices can be learned both at school in computer labs or at companies in the industry which have ties with the university. In addition, CDIO guidelines and criteria for Standard No. 5 and 7 are utilized in the structure of this proposed approach. That way, as much as at-work practices may change in the everyday real world, the structures of the project do not have to change that much as long as related theories still hold their value. If it is no longer necessary to learn a certain theory, instructors may remove that theory and its related at-work practices all together. The validity of this case study is backed by observation and interview results with a significant number of instructors, students and engineers in the industry while its results are helpful in leveraging instructors’ flexible handling of the course materials and in enabling students to master both hacking skills and knowledge in a shorter amount of time.

Proceedings of the 13th International CDIO Conference in Calgary, Canada, June 18-22 2017

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